Mentoring as the technique to enhance workers performance

Mentoring is quite simply a relationship where one person helps another to
improve their knowledge, work or thinking. It is a very valuable development tool for both the person seeking support (the mentee) and the person giving the support (the mentor).

Mentoring is quite simply a relationship where one person helps another to  
improve their knowledge, work or thinking. It is a very valuable development tool for both the person seeking support (the mentee) and the person giving the support (the mentor).

Benefits of mentoring

  • Faster career progress.
  • Excellent value for money for the organisation as the financial cost is relatively small.
  • Enhances company image. The company does not want to be associated with a poor turnover record and encouraging learning helps staff to achieve their full potential and not look for new employment.




  • Improved motivation. Employees often feel that real improvements in competences are delivered from the mentoring process. This can preserve the well-being of employees and others, improves employee morale, trust and motivation.

Who is a mentor

mentor should be someone who:

  • Can give practical support and advice.
  • Can give technical, ethical and general business guidance.
  • Can help with development of interpersonal and work skills.
  • Is an impartial sounding board – a mentor would generally have no direct reporting responsibility.
  • Is a good guide, counsellor.
  • Is a role model who can help improve career goals.
mentor should be someone who:  
Can give practical support and advice.  
Can give technical, ethical and general business guidance.  
Can help with development of interpersonal and work skills.  
Is an impartial sounding board – a mentor would generally have no direct  reporting responsibility.  
Is a good guide, counsellor.  
Is a role model who can help improve career goals.

Quite often a mentor is from the same function (i.e. finance), it is unusual for them to be a direct line manager. The mentor is normally a role model, having already achieved a status (and possibly qualification) to which the subordinate aspires.




For a mentoring system to be successful, relationships should not be based on authority but rather a genuine wish by the mentors to share knowledge, advice and experience and should be one of mutual trust.
Mentoring works alongside more formal control mechanisms, such as appraisal, and is intended to provide the employee with a forum to discuss development issues which is relaxed and supportive. Mentors often discuss such issues as training, the choice of qualification, interpersonal problems and career goals.

The mentor should give honest but supportive feedback and guidance on how weaknesses can be eliminated or neutralised. The mentor could also act as a sounding board for ideas. The process should help junior staff to question and reflect on their experiences.

The role of a mentor is to encourage and assist junior members of staff to
analyse their performance in order to identify their strengths and weaknesses.

The mentor should give honest but supportive feedback and guidance on how weaknesses can be eliminated or neutralised. The mentor could also act as a sounding board for ideas. The process should help junior staff to question and reflect on their experiences.




A mentoring system has both career-enhancing and psychological functions. The career function is concerned primarily with enhancing career advancement through exposure, visibility and sponsorship. The psychological function is more concerned with aspects of the relationship that primarily enhance competence and effectiveness in management roles. A mentoring system should help junior staff in expanding their network of contacts and gain greater exposure in the organisation.

For a mentoring system to be successful, relationships should not be based on authority but rather a genuine wish by the mentors to share knowledge, advice and experience and should be one of mutual trust.
Mentoring works alongside more formal control mechanisms, such as appraisal, and is intended to provide the employee with a forum to discuss development issues which is relaxed and supportive. Mentors often discuss such issues as training, the choice of qualification, interpersonal problems and career goals.

7 thoughts on “Mentoring as the technique to enhance workers performance”

  1. Pingback: FORMAL PROCESS OF DEVELOPING IFRS BY IASB - ACCOUNTING FREE RESOURCES

  2. Pingback: Advantages and limitations of double entry system - ACCOUNTING FREE RESOURCES

  3. Pingback: Types of accounting vouchers - ACCOUNTING FREE RESOURCES

  4. Pingback: IMPORTANCE OF ACCOUNTING STANDARDS (IFRS) - ACCOUNTING FREE RESOURCES

  5. Pingback: TYPES AND IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNICATION - ACCOUNTING FREE RESOURCES

  6. Pingback: Features of double entry system - ACCOUNTING FREE RESOURCES

  7. Pingback: Ways in which a business can create an environment that stimulates OR promote creative thinking - ACCOUNTING FREE RESOURCES

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *